iPhone History

In a scant few hours now, we’ll dive into chapter five in one of the most compelling stories of our digital-dominated era: The Life And Times of the iPhone. So for those of you who haven’t been paying attention, and even those of you who have (hands up if you remember the ROKR iTunes phone), here’s a recap — courtesy of Thinglink, a startup that makes interactive photos and ads.

Hover over the infographic to reveal pictures, videos and links from iPhone history. (The launch date of each phone is at the top of its screen.) Take note of the chips used in each iteration, and find out more about the real genius behind the iPhone’s design. Wax nostalgic in the comments about your favorite moments. And get ready for a whole new chapter Tuesday morning, whether it’s the iPhone 5, the 4S or both.

iPhone 5: Will You Upgrade?

The iPhone 5 is on the way, and millions of people are asking themselves, is it time to upgrade? This infographic will point you in the right direction.

Let’s take a look at the current state of the iPhone 4 and its predecessors, how many apps users have installed, how much they’re using the iPhone and what new features they’d like to see in the next one. That should give us a good idea about whether we should upgrade, and why.

This elaborate infographic is part 1 of a three-part series that will lead us up to the launch of the iPhone 5, which is likely to be announced on Oct. 4. Developed by AYTM (Ask Your Target Market) and research firm PaidViewpoint along with Mashable, the survey asked 1,000 U.S. iPhone owners aged 18 years and older an extensive series of questions.

The result? A comprehensive set of data that pointed to their intentions to upgrade early to the iPhone 5 and a whole lot more:

 

4.7 Million LinkedIn Users Are Employed by Small Businesses

There are more paths to a good job than the usual four years of college and an internship at a big firm. As the infographic below shows, a fair number of people on LinkedInare veterans of the military services or graduates of community colleges.

For the former, operations and information technology have been the most fertile fields, while community college grads tend to wind up in business or computer science.

The data also show opportunities outside of big business: Some 4.7 million LinkedIn members — out of roughly 100 million in total — are employed by small businesses. It’s unclear how many of those are new to their positions, but many LinkedIn members have moved around of late. According to the company, there have been 7.4 million job changes since 2009.

What do you think? Are four-year degrees overrated? Let us know in the comments.

Facebook’s Navigation Bar Update

Many Facebook users (us included) noticed that the top navigation bar is now locked on top of the screen even if you scroll the page down. This behavior is new: Before, the top navigation bar would scroll up with the page, and now it’s visible all the time.

This subtle change lets users always access some of the most important features on Facebook: friend requests, messages, notifications and search on the left side, as well as home and profile anchor buttons and account settings on the right.

For comparison, Twitter uses a similar floating design for its navigation bar, which is also always visible on top.

Inside Facebook thinks this may be the first stage in a much bigger redesign, which is to be unveiled at Facebook’s F8 conference. If they’re right, Facebook is looking to lock the ads on the right side of the screen to be always visible, too, which would surely increase the click-through rates but would also make the page a bit more crowded.

Has the new, locked top navigation bar gone live for you? How do you like it? Please, share your opinions in the comments.

How Television Has Changed Over 10 Years

Television has come a long way during the past decade. A new infographic from deals site VoucherCodes.co.uk shows just how much, illustrating the changes in technology and sales. It’s hard to believe that just 10 years ago, the unwieldy Cathode-Ray Tubes were still prevalent.

Sept. 7 marks the birth of the television — on this date in 1927, the first fully electronic television was successfully executed by Philo Farnsworth. Widespread consumer use of television sets was still way off, though.

The infographic itself looks at the last seven years of television sales, as well as projections for the next three. And it may be the size statistics — not those concerning sales — that surprise you. An average television in 2004 was 27 inches, a figure that’s since grown to 37. The average size is projected to reach 60 inches by 2015. Especially given that the newest technologies in 3D television have only captured a small portion of the market, the sheer amount of wall real estate our televisions occupy stands out as remarkable.

Twitter to Launch Ads in the UK in October

Twitter is finalizing deals with partners and is on course to launch ads in the UK in October, according to a recent report.

Twitter has been talking with brands for several months, Marketing Magazine says, citing agency sources. O2, Vodafone, Sky and Sony will be the first to take advantage of Twitter’s promoted tweets, trends and accounts.

While the details of the deals are unknown, one source claims Twitter is currently selling ad bundles and asking for six figure investments.

According to another source, Twitter may also sell regional ads in addition to country-specific promotions.

Twitter started offering ads in the U.S. in April 2010 and has been slowly expanding the program ever since.

This summer, Twitter started showing promoted tweets in users’ streams, but only to users who actually follow the brand sending the tweets. Last week, All Things D said Twitter plans to expand that idea by showing ads based on users’ interests, regardless of whether they follow a certain brand.

Sony Reveals Launch Date for Sony Tablets

Sony has revealed the specifications and launch dates for its two forthcoming tablet devices, Sony Tablet S and Sony Tablet P.

Although both are Android-based, Sony’s tablets are quite different from the other Android tablets on the market, which generally follow the iPad‘s design philosophy.

Sony Tablet P sports a foldable design, with two 5.5-inch screens, 4 GB of storage space, a NVIDIA Tegra 2 processor and Wi-Fi/3G connectivity. Tablet P can be described as a pocket tablet, measuring 79 x 180 x 26mm and weighing only 327 grams. We like how Sony is breaking new ground here, and we’re eager to see whether the market will embrace this novel design.

Sony Tablet S has a more standard slate design, but unlike most other tablets on the market, it’s thicker on one end than the other. It has a 9.4-inch display, a NVIDIA Tegra 2 CPU and Wi-Fi/3G connectivity. It’s also very light, weighing approximately 598 grams. It will come with either 16 GB or 32 GB of storage.

Both will be available as Wi-Fi-only or Wi-Fi/3G devices, the former coming with Android 3.2, and the later with Android 3.1, although an upgrade is planned for the future. Also, both will come with a 5-megapixel rear and a 0.3-megapixel front-facing camera, a USB 2.0 port and an SD card slot.

Sony squeezed a couple extra features into its new tablets. Both devices will have a 3-axis accelerometer, a gyro sensor, a digital compass and an ambient light sensor. Tablet S will come with infrared remote control functionality. Both are compatible with Sony’s Media Remote technology, which allows you to control Sony devices, including ones from the BRAVIA line, through Wi-Fi.

Finally, both devices are “PlayStation Certified,” meaning you’ll be able to play original games such as Crash Bandicoot and Pinball Heroes on your tablet.

Sony Tablet S will be available in the UK at Sony Centres, Currys & PC World and John Lewis in mid-Sept., with pre-orders beginning Aug. 31 at www.sony.co.uk, www.currys.co.uk and www.pcworld.co.uk. Sony Tablet P is scheduled for a November 2011 release.

World’s First Glasses Free 3D Laptop

Toshiba announced the Qosmio F755 3D laptop on Tuesday, describing it as “the world’s first laptop capable of displaying glasses-free 3D and 2D content at the same time on one screen.”

The press release proudly featured the laptop specs in the body of the text, but other seemingly minute details — such as potential health risks of 3D viewing, in this case — were kept in the footnotes. One footnote stated:

“Due to the possible impact on vision development, viewers of 3D video images should be age 6 or above. Children and teenagers may be more susceptible to health issues associated with viewing in 3D and should be closely supervised to avoid prolonged viewing without rest. Some viewers may experience a seizure or blackout when exposed to certain flashing images or lights contained in certain 3D television pictures or video games. Anyone who has had a seizure, loss of awareness, or other symptom linked to an epileptic condition, or has a family history of epilepsy, should contact a health care provider before using the 3D function.”

That disclaimer footnote then points to another more lengthy disclaimer on Toshiba’s website entitled, “3D Viewing: Important Safety Information,” in which another list of health risks continues. The first point on the list is especially poignant:

“If you or any viewer experiences the following symptoms or any other discomfort from viewing 3D video images, stop viewing and contact your health care provider: Convulsions, Eye or muscle twitching, Loss of awareness, Altered vision, Involuntary movements, Disorientation, Eye Strain, Nausea/Vomiting, Dizziness, Headaches, Fatigue.”

Priced at $1,700, the laptop will be available in mid-August. One can’t help but wonder if consumers will be paying attention to these small details relating to their health when deciding to purchase the latest in technological wonders.

It can be argued that these health risks apply for any type of 3D viewing — even so, should they be relegated to the footnotes?

What are your thoughts on how tech companies should disclaim health risks regarding use of their products? And is owning a 3D laptop worth risking your health? Let us know in the comments below.

Facebook Use May Lead to Psychological Disorders in Teens

Increasing research on social media’s effects on human interaction has revealed the development of antisocial behavior, narcissism and a slew of other character flaws and negative by-products.

Overdosing on Facebook may lead to the development of such psychological disorders in teens, according to a recent study conducted by Larry Rosen, a professor of psychology at California State University.

In a presentation titled “Poke Me: How Social Networks Can Both Help and Harm Our Kids” at the 119th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association, Rosen presented his findings based on a number of computer-based surveys distributed to 1,000 urban adolescents and his 15-minute observations of 300 teens in the act of studying.

Some of the negative side effects of Facebook use for teens that Rosen cited include:

  • Development of narcissism in teens who often use Facebook;
  • Presence of other psychological disorders, including antisocial behaviors, mania and aggressive tendencies, in teens who have a strong Facebook presence;
  • Increased absence from school and likelihood of developing stomach aches, sleeping problems, anxiety and depression, in teens who “overdose” in technology on a daily basis, including Facebook and video games;
  • Lower grades for middle school, high school and college students who checked Facebook at least once during a 15-minute study period;
  • Lower reading retention rates for students who most frequently had Facebook open on their computers during the 15-minute study period.

Not all findings were negative, however — one of the more interesting points from Rosen’s research was the development of “virtual empathy.”

Generally, we think of empathy as an in-person activity, where hugs, facial expressions and kind words help improve a loved one’s mood. Rosen says that teens are developing the ability to show virtual empathy for distressed Facebook friends and that the empathy is actually well-received by friends, positively influencing their mood.

This virtual empathy, he says, can even spill over into the real world, teaching teens how to empathize with others in everyday life.

Phone Wars

It’s no secret how much most people are attached to their cellphones, but now TeleNav has released a survey showing just how willing Americans are to give up the finer things in life so they can still hang onto that handset.

Think about this hypothetical situation for a moment: What would you be more willing to give up so you could still have your mobile phone?

Not only does this infographic give you insight into mobile-device love, but it also helps you sort out general priorities as well. For instance, one third of the U.S. population would rather give up sex for a week than a mobile phone, but 70% were willing to give up alcohol for that phone?

Or who would’ve guessed that smartphone users had worse manners than their cellphone counterparts, with 26% of smartphone users frequently pulling out their handset at the dinner table, compared with 6% of cellphone (“featurephone”) users?

Worse (and this one’s not included in the infographic) — “Smartphone users were twice as likely as feature phone users to give up hot showers rather than their phone for one week,” according to TeleNav’s survey. Now that’s got to be love.