Phone Wars

It’s no secret how much most people are attached to their cellphones, but now TeleNav has released a survey showing just how willing Americans are to give up the finer things in life so they can still hang onto that handset.

Think about this hypothetical situation for a moment: What would you be more willing to give up so you could still have your mobile phone?

Not only does this infographic give you insight into mobile-device love, but it also helps you sort out general priorities as well. For instance, one third of the U.S. population would rather give up sex for a week than a mobile phone, but 70% were willing to give up alcohol for that phone?

Or who would’ve guessed that smartphone users had worse manners than their cellphone counterparts, with 26% of smartphone users frequently pulling out their handset at the dinner table, compared with 6% of cellphone (“featurephone”) users?

Worse (and this one’s not included in the infographic) — “Smartphone users were twice as likely as feature phone users to give up hot showers rather than their phone for one week,” according to TeleNav’s survey. Now that’s got to be love.

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Google+ reaches 20 Million Mark in 3 Weeks

Google’s new Social Networking site Google+ has reached a massive 20 million subscribers, as almost everyone wants in on the action.  Its just been a week since Google’s Larry Page said that Google plus reached 10 million. Page noted at the time that the service remains in a “field trial” mode, and with “a lot of barriers” to use it right now, but that the company is continuing to expand how many have access to it.

Despite its massive growth in its first three weeks, a population of 20 million is just a grain of sand in comparison with Facebook’s 750 million, half of whom log in daily.

A Facebook Game for Your Inner Serial Killer

Those of you who have a need to satisfy the Dark Passenger within — and who know what that means — will find relief in “Dexter Slice of Life”, a social game for Facebook that’s based on the decadently sinister Showtime series Dexter and its vigilante serial killer.

Showtime released a trailer and screenshot for Slice of Life, developed by Ecko Code, at Comic-Con. The game will be released in September.

The game will launch on Facebook alongside the Season 6 television premiere. Players will take on the role of Dexter Morgan — the serial killer of serial killers — and they’ll be tasked with stalking victims, satisfying the dark passenger, finding evidence and completing missions. It’s the first Facebook game to offer real-time stealth gameplay.

The game will mirror the events of each new episode. In fact, “Dexter Slice of Life” players can expect to awake to updates Monday after each Sunday evening airing.

Ecko, a game publisher for more than a decade, has no intentions of disappointing Dexter fans. To that end, his team will use a variety of social media analysis tools to figure out the story lines, characters and show moments that are resonating with fans in real time. The idea, says Ecko, is to blur the lines between the show’s content and gameplay.

“This is a living, breathing narrative-based consumer product, no different than the show,” says Ecko. “[Fans] want it and expect it to be as good as the show.”

“Slice of Life,” inspired by Zynga’s social games, takes the casual genre to the next level. Ecko calls it “Cas-Core gaming” — a blend of casual (because it’s on Facebook) and hardcore games (because all the game assets are built in a 3D massively multiplayer online client).

Some trivia for non-fans: “Dexter Slice of Life” gets its name from the name of the boat the show’s lead character uses to dispose of the bodies he kills and dismembers. Something tells us this game won’t be much like your typical casual game.

Check out the game trailer above and the screenshot below, and let us know your thoughts on the soon-to-be released Facebook game.

Are Men Better Networkers Than Women?

Men are generally better networkers, except when it comes to industries like tobacco and ranching.

At least, that’s according to findings by LinkedIn‘s analytics team. The researchers also found that men were better networkers in the cosmetics industry.

LinkedIn determined the “networking savviness” of the sexes in various professions by comparing the number of connections that men have to the number women have, and looking at the ratio of male to female members. For example, LinkedIn labeled an industry that was 45% female, with women having 70% of the connections, as “female savvy.” Neutral industries were the ones in which the percentage of women in the industry equaled their percentage of connections.

Since LinkedIn doesn’t require members to register their sex, some guesswork was involved. As Scott Nicholson, senior data scientist at LinkedIn, wrote on the company’s official blog Wednesday, “We can guess a person’s gender using their first name and some previously established techniques using a database of baby names.”

 

How the World Uses Social Networks

Social networks in every country might live on the same Internet, but that doesn’t prevent differences in online customs and culture from developing along geographic borders.

Ongoing market research service Global Web Index has mapped these differences in the infographic above (click it to enlarge).

The research, run by London-based consultancy Trendstream, has conducted six waves of surveys about global consumer adoption of the Internet and social media in 36 markets. It used data from its February 2011 surveys of between 750 and 2,000 online users in each market to define three behavior types: messagers, groupers and content sharers.

In some countries, many of them Asian, most people were focused on content sharing. Others, like the UK and Canada, had more people who put a greater emphasis on sending messages.

Trendstream also used data from the survey to map social network penetration in each country that it surveyed.

Does the way any country uses social networks surprise you? Let us know in the comments.